NEWCASTLE UNITED 95-96

 By Chris Simpson

Seeing this fantastic Adidas shirt again in LeoJuniors classic list conjured up some great flashbacks. The first time I saw this (along with many others I guess) was when the transfer record was smashed and Alan Shearer was unveiled to the Geordie masses.

I remember the Grandad collar being a big leap away from the designs of the time and the material was something altogether different as well. For me, this is quite simply one of the best football tops ever made. Clean lines with straight forward, no-nonsense colours finished off nicely with the partnership of the 'Nookie Brown' sponsors of the time.

Nobody who follows the game can surely forget the side that Kevin Keegan took within touching distance of winning the league in this kit, Les Ferdinand, Phillipe Albert, Rob Lee, David Ginola et al.

Hammering Manchester United 5-0 in the pouring rain is one game which really stands out in the memory whenever I see this shirt. Even the lettering & numbers were really good on this shirt in the days before all Premier League sides had to conform to the standard issue. Quite simply - A classic. I have to agree.

The Busby Babes before the game at Red Star Belgrade in the European Cup, the last time they were to play together

Manchester United will mark the 50th anniversary of the plane crash that killed eight members of its famed team of "Busby Babes" by playing February's Premier League match against Manchester City in a 1950s style kit.

United has been given special permission by the Premier League and its sponsors to wear the plain red jerseys and baggy shorts for the Feb. 10 match at Old Trafford.

A limited-edition shirt, featuring the names of every player to have represented City in a competitive fixture at Ashton Gate, is now on sale in the Bristol City Shop. Produced in an exclusive run of just 1,000, the commemorative top has been produced to mark 100 years of football played by the club at their home ground.

In 2004 a limited-edition shirt, featuring the names of every player to have represented Bristol City in a competitive fixture at Ashton Gate was launched. Produced in an exclusive run of just 1,000, the commemorative top was produced to mark 100 years of football played by the club at their home ground. 

 The names of all 762 players who have appeared for the club in a competitive fixture at Ashton Gate since the first Football League game was played at the venue on 3rd September 1904 are printed on the shirt.

Figures from Walker by Matthew CarterBy Sander Neijnens - Shirtnumbers

For the upcoming tournament Euro 2008, Adidas and Puma have introduced new shirt numbers. Some examples can be seen on www.footballshirtculture.com. In the Adidas numbers (e.g. Germany, Greece) we recognize the same basic forms as in the typeface Walker that was designed by Matthew Carter for the Walker Arts Center in Minneapolis.

But in the Adidas numbers all beginnings and endings of the strokes are rounded, which remind me of the sausage numbers that were introduced by Nike in 2000. As in the number 1 the flag is chopped of, it looks like a real Frankfurter.

Puma has renounced the numbers designed by Dalton Maag in 2006. When we look at the new numbers (e.g. Czech Republic), it appears that the strokes also have rounded beginnings and endings. Were they made by the same designer who's responsible for the Adidas numbers? Or can we conclude that there's a real sausage fashion? Or is this tournament sponsored by the international meat industry?

Rovers winger Bentley turned up on the Old Trafford pitch with the legend 'BETNLEY' emblazoned across the back of his shirt.

Things didn't quite go according to plan for Blackburn on Sunday. Two first-half goals from Cristiano Ronaldo condemned Mark Hughes' men to a 2-0 defeat, and a soft red card for David Dunn only added to the manager's frustration.

But one look at the back of David Bentley's shirt revealed even the Blackburn kitman had an off-day.

Rovers winger Bentley turned up on the Old Trafford pitch with the legend 'BETNLEY' emblazoned across the back of his shirt.

Scotland have not always played in the distinctive dark blue shirts we associate with the team. On at least nine occasions between 1881 and 1951 they played in the primrose and pink racing colours of racehorse owner Archibald Philip Primrose, Lord Rosebery.

Scotland have not always played in the distinctive dark blue shirts we associate with the team. On at least nine occasions between 1881 and 1951 they played in the primrose and pink racing colours of racehorse owner Archibald Philip Primrose, Lord Rosebery.

Rosebery developed a keen in interest in association football and was an early patron of the sport in Scotland. In 1882 he donated a trophy, the Rosebery Charity Cup, to be competed for by clubs under the jurisdiction of the East of Scotland FA. The competition lasted over 60 years and raised thousands of pounds for charities in the Edinburgh area.

Frontline Football

Self-cleaning fabrics could revolutionize the sport apparel industry. The same technology, created by scientists working for the U.S. Air Force, has already been used to create t-shirts and underwear that can be worn hygenically for weeks without washing.

Self-cleaning fabrics could revolutionize the sport apparel industry. The same technology, created by scientists working for the U.S. Air Force, has already been used to create t-shirts and underwear that can be worn hygienically for weeks without washing.

The new technology attaches nanoparticles to clothing fibers using microwaves. Then, chemicals that can repel water, oil and bacteria are directly bound to the nanoparticles. These two elements combine to create a protective coating on the fibers of the material. This coating both kills bacteria, and forces liquids to bead and run off (see diagram above).

The research found that over a third of the most successful teams in The FA Cup wear red home shirts. In the last ten years, just four teams have won the FA Cup including red giants Arsenal, Liverpool and this year’s FA Cup finalists, Manchester United.

Colour could be having a big impact on success both in the boardroom and on the football pitch, according to E.ON - the company that runs Powergen and sponsors The FA Cup.

The Colour and Imaging Group at the Department of Colour and Polymer Chemistry, University of Leeds, analysed the logos of all FTSE 100 companies and the shirts of every football team that have made the FA Cup Quarter Finals over the last 20 years, to find out if their success could be related to their colour (1).

Mexico will ditch its traditional green jersey, as coach Hugo Sanchez has claimed players are struggling to distinguish it from the grass on the field. The Mexican national team will wear white jerseys for home games and red while playing on the road.

Mexico will ditch its traditional green jersey, as coach Hugo Sanchez has claimed players are struggling to distinguish it from the grass on the field. The Mexican national team will wear white jerseys for home games and red while playing on the road.

"This is not new. I've been thinking about it since I took over," Sanchez said. "In my opinion, our green is confusing with the pitch - as grass is green. It looks like there are less players on the field."

Dr Jack Fawbert, Senior Lecturer in Sociology, at the University of Bedfordshire, has completed his research study, entitled ‘Representations of Change; Community, Culture and Replica Football Shirts’, which explores the social symbolism of football shirts  

The first study into the meanings people attach to replica football shirts and why they wear them is about to be published.

Dr Jack Fawbert, Senior Lecturer in Sociology, at the University of Bedfordshire, has completed his research study, entitled ‘Representations of Change; Community, Culture and Replica Football Shirts’, which explores the social symbolism of football shirts

He examined what shirts, their designs, sponsors and colours mean to football fans, how they 'read' them, how they interpret them and how they use them to signify their support for teams. He also looked at what the shirts signify about fans in the context of support for particular clubs and the social milieu of those clubs.